Search results for: for

Tibial Plateau Fractures are complicated injuries which have in the past required surgical measures resulting in large scars and soft tissue damage. However, after extensive review of the literature and prolonged experience with various operative techniques used to fix different types of tibial plateau fractures Professor Munjed Al Muderis has developed an Arthroscopically Assisted minimally invasive technique to fix any kind of tibial plateau fracture.

This technique utilises arthroscopic technology (key hole surgery) to visualise the fracture and secure its accurate reduction, followed by internal fixation using a pre-contoured periarticular plate via a minimally invasive (small incision) technique.

In this video, Professor Munjed Al Muderis takes you through the steps involved in this very effective Tibial Plateau Fracture operation.

 

 

Published in Surgery
Monday, 06 February 2012 00:00

Standard Total Knee Replacement Surgery

 

In this video Professor Munjed Al Muderis performs Total Knee Replacement surgery (Knee Arthroplasty). This video demonstrates replacing the diseased or damaged joint surfaces of the knee with metal and plastic components which are shaped to allow continued motion of the knee.

Published in Surgery
Monday, 06 February 2012 00:00

Revision Total Knee Replacement

 

A Revision Total Knee Replacement occurs when a Total Knee Replacement (Knee Arthroplasty) is not functioning correctly due to factors such as incorrect surgical technique or excessive damage from use.

In this video, Professor Munjed Al Muderis takes you through a Revision Knee Arthroplasty.

Published in Surgery
Monday, 06 February 2012 00:00

MPFL Reconstruction for Patella Malalignment

 

Patella Femoral Malalignment is a very difficult condition to treat. To date there have been more than 100 different operations described to deal with this problem, however none are bulletproof. Because of this Professor Munjed Al Muderis has developed a new technique which involves reconstructing the medial patella femoral ligament using an artificial ligament. This technique demonstrates very promising results, good patient recovery and no single recurrence or dislocation so far. 

In this video Professor Munjed Al Muderis takes you through the steps involved in this very effective operation.

Published in Surgery

 

In this video Professor Al Muderis demonstrates a Tibial Osteotomy using new Navigation Technology which assists with the surgery.

Published in Surgery

 

The OGAP-OPL implant provides people with above-the-knee and below-the-knee amputations with a leg replacement which is designed to be as close to the human anatomy as possible. This video is Part 2 of a three part series which demonstrates each of the stages of the osseointegration surgical procedure. In this video, Professor Munjed Al Muderis inserts the femoral stem prosthesis into the patients stump.

Click here to view Stage 1 - Osteotomy 

Click here to view Stage 3 - Final Stage

 

Published in Surgery
Monday, 06 February 2012 00:00

Integral Leg Prosthesis: Stage 1 - Osteotomy

 

The OGAP-OPL implant provides people with above-the-knee and below-the-knee amputations with a leg replacement which is designed to be as close to the human anatomy as possible. This video is Part 1 of a three part series which demonstrates each of the stages of the osseointegration surgical procedure. In this video, Professor Munjed Al Muderis performs an osteotomy of the femur to allow for the prosthesis to be inserted in a later operation.

Click here to view Stage 2 - Femoral Stem Prosthesis 

Click here to view Stage 3 - Final Stage

Published in Surgery

The OGAP-OPL implant provides people with above-the-knee and below-the-knee amputations with a leg replacement which is designed to be as close to the human anatomy as possible. This video is Part 3 of a three part series which demonstrates each of the stages of the osseointegration surgical procedure. In this video, Professor Munjed Al Muderis performs the final surgical stage of the osseointegration procedure. 

Click here to view Stage 1 - Osteotomy 

Click here to view Stage 2 - Femoral Stem Prosthesis 

 

 

 

 

Published in Surgery
Monday, 06 February 2012 00:00

ACL Reconstruction using LARS Ligament

Using computer animation, this video demonstrates the surgical procedure for an ACL Reconstruction using LARS ligaments. 

 

LARS Ligaments:

LARS (Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System) ligaments are artificial ligaments used for the intra or extra-articular reconstruction of ruptured ligaments. LARS ligaments are used to reconstruct a torn ACL and are designed to mimic the normal anatomic ligament fibres in the knee. The intra-articular longitudinal fibres resist fatigue and allow fibroblastic growth. The extra-articular woven fibres provide strength and resistance to stretch.

LARS ligaments can be used in conjunction with suturing to the remaining section of the ruptured ligament, or as a stand-alone reconstruction. 

LARS ligaments can be used to reconstruct both the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments.

For each patient the LARS ligaments are precisely selected according to the weight and activity level of each indivdual patient.

Using LARS ligaments can reduce surgery time considerably as no additional harvesting of grafts is needed. Thus the patient can expect a faster return to full function compared with ACL reconstruction using hamstrings or patella tendon grafts. This is largely due to LARS ligaments allowing the original ligament tissues to heal in the absence of traction.

 

Advantages of LARS:

  • Earlier return to work (depending on particular activity level and individual recovery time)
  • Earlier return to competitive training 
  • Earlier return to full contact sports once the sense of motion and muscle strength has completely returned
  • Shorter surgical procedure 

 

Surgical Procedure

Using LARS ligaments ACL surgery can be performed using minimally invasive surgery (All-Inside ACL Reconstruction), which involves a smaller incision than the conventional ACL surgery. There are no donor site complications since there is no need to harvest hamstring tendons or patella tendons.

To place the graft in place, tunnels will be drilled precisely through the remnants of the original ACL using an arthroscopic technique. The ligament is pulled into the bony tunnels whilst it is observed through an endoscope. The LARS ligament should pass through the centre of the original ACL. Once in place the LARS ligament is covered by native tissue and fixed with two titanium screws.

The surgical time is expected to take between one and two hours.

 

 

Published in Information

 

Hip Arthroscopy is an excellent minimally invasive procedure which can be used to visualise, diagnose and address different pathologies in the hip joint. In this video Professor Munjed Al Muderis takes you through the steps involved in this very effective procedure.

Published in Surgery